Eating Mom: A Collision of Feminisms in American Art

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, two generations of feminists collided. One responded to art-making as protofeminists; the other group responded as Conceptualist artists. Richard Flood, Chief Curator of the New Museum, will discuss two generations of feminist art. Richard Flood is Chief Curator of the New Museum. Prior to his 2005 appointment at the New Museum, Flood was Chief Curator of the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, where he organized a wide range of exhibitions, including "Brilliant!: New Art from London;" "Zero to Infinity: Arte Povera 1962-1972;" and solo exhibitions on the work of Robert Gober, Sigmar Polke, and Matthew Barney. Flood was previously curator of P.S.1, director of the Barbara Gladstone Gallery, and managing editor of Artforum magazine. He recently coordinated the exhibition "Double Album: Daniel Guzman and Steven Shearer," which opened in April at the New Museum. He also co-organized "Unmonumental," an exhibition in four parts that inaugurated the New Museum's new SANAA-designed building. *Afternoon Workshop: 1-3 pm* Following Flood's talk, New Museum educators will workshop ideas in response to the morning session's theme. Participants will explore visual inquiry and object-based learning in the New Museum's galleries and develop lesson plans around current exhibitions.

Eating Mom: A Collision of Feminisms in American Art

A series for teachers and educators to provide historical content and context that addresses concerns and issues that arise while teaching contemporary art.